Processes and networks around digital learning materials

This blog post is a co-production of Ben Janssen (OpenEd Consult) and me. Nederlandse versie

The purpose of this series of blogs is to provide arguments that may be relevant when formulating a vision and policy for OERs. Vision and policy are necessary for adoption of OERs to be sustainable. Many OER initiatives start with an initial project grant but is not continued once the project is completed (Tlili et al, 2020; Annand, 2015). Paraphrasing, we might also say “Is there life after the project grant?”. In an advisory report for the OECD, David Wiley (2007) indicated that a distinction can be made between two issues regarding the sustainability of OER:

  1. How to sustain the production and sharing of OER?
  2. How to sustain the use and reuse of OER by end users?

Vision development and policy will have to address both issues.

In the previous blog, we have presented a framework for categorization of digital learning materials and the specific position of OER. In this blog, we will present two models: a process model for how instructors and students “deal” with digital learning materials and a model for the networks/contexts in which “users” of digital open educational resources operate. Vision and policy for OER will need to take both – the practices of users and the networks in which users operate – into account (Tlili et al, 2020).

A process model for using digital learning resources

In the zone Towards digital (open) educational resources of the Acceleration Plan a process model has been developed in order to get an idea of what the use of digital learning materials looks like in practice.

Their model was adapted to include semi-open and commercial learning resources, as well as the role of the student. The adaptations were made on the basis of observations and experiences in practice of the members of the zone.

The extended process model shows the activities an instructor and a student undertake in order to accomplish their optimal mix of learning resources. “Optimal mix” is defined as the mix of learning resources that, in the eyes of the instructor or student, most effectively supports his or her teaching and learning process that should lead to the achievement of the learning outcomes.

The process model distinguishes two scenarios:

  1. Scenario 1: the reading list. The instructor assembles what he/she considers to be an optimum mix for both the learning process to be supported by the student and for use in his/her educational process. The instructor determines which learning resources are compulsory and which are recommended additionally. The student uses these materials to compile his/her optimal mix. Communication about learning resources between the instructor and the student usually takes place via a list of required and optional learning materials (“the reading list”) compiled by the instructor.
  2. Scenario 2: the instruction. The instructor defines an assignment and usually provides a list of recommended literature (in some institutions also referred to as a reference list). Communication regarding learning resources between the instructor and the student is more diffuse than in scenario 1. Initially, there will be at least one instruction from the instructor to the student that will help guide the optimal mix of learning resources for the student (“the instruction”).

Scenario 1: the reading list

Figure 1 shows the process model for scenario 1.

Figure 1. Creation of optimal mix of learning materials, process model for scenario reading list. Click on the image to enlarge

An instructor will compile a mix of learning resources that best fits the learning outcomes to be achieved and his/her own educational process. That composition is visualised by the dotted shape in the diagram. The instructor searches for learning resources that can be either open or closed. Those resources can already be in his/her possession (in a private database, generally a hard drive), a local database (for example a departmental or institutional repository of learning resources, often a shared network drive), or in the “cloud”. In many cases, an instructor herself/himself will also create learning resources, which also includes mixes and adaptations of learning resources found elsewhere. The mix of learning resources will be subject to a quality control process, which may or may not be explicit. This quality control can also be carried out by people other than the instructor (for example, colleagues). Ultimately, the mix of learning resources will either be published (i.e. made available to students) or used in educational activities. In the latter case, those materials may not be made available to students. For example, a video that is shown in the lecture hall but that is not distributed further. It may also be the case that educational resources used in the educational activity become available to students. These might include copies of the slides that the instructor uses in the educational activity. Publishing the optimum mix of educational resources in any case involves specifying the titles of the educational resources (usually textbooks) that must be studied, whether or not it is compulsory (the reading list).

Experiences with the use of learning materials can be input for a quality check and possibly lead to adjustment of the optimal mix, during or after the course for which the optimal mix is composed. Consider, for example, a situation in which students during an educational activity indicate that they do not possess the prior knowledge that the instructor assumed was present. The instructor can then supplement the optimal mix with learning materials that fill in the knowledge gap. Feedback on the quality by students can also take place via a course evaluation (represented in the figure by the dotted arrow).

Based on the published mix of learning resources (including the reading list), the student will compile his/her own mix of learning resources. While studying or during an educational activity, the student can search for or create additional learning resources and add these to his/her optimal mix of learning resources. Quality control is expected to be implicit and based on the usefulness that the student experiences in achieving the formulated learning objectives. Think, for example, of the experiences the student has when doing exercises to master a certain mathematical concept. When the student is not able to do all the exercises, he or she will look for additional sources to gain knowledge that is apparently not yet present. Such practices are described in more detail in (Schuwer, Baas & De Ruijter, 2021).

A student may decide to publish parts of his or her mix for third parties. For example, making lecture notes available to fellow students in a study association.

Scenario 2: the instruction

Figure 2 shows the process model for scenario 2.

Figure 2 Creation of optimal mix of learning materials, process model for scenario instruction. Click on the image to enlarge

The activities correspond largely to those described in scenario 1. The teacher defines an assignment. If necessary, a list of recommended literature for carrying out the assignment is compiled and, if necessary, the teacher also produces teaching materials. All of this is published and made available to students (the instruction). What was written about quality control on the instructor’s side in scenario 1 also applies in this scenario. Based on the instructions, the student starts compiling his/her optimal mix of learning resources.

In this scenario, students can also publish their own (learning) materials (open or semi-open), both in local storage and in the “cloud”. The student will then also have access to local storage for materials in his/her optimal mix. This situation arises, for example, when students create and publish learning materials as part of their learning process. Such didactic forms of working characterize educational approaches such as Open Pedagogy and Open Educational Practices. Quality control of the materials to be published can be carried out by both the instructor and the student. Conversely, when an instructor and students jointly create and publish educational resources (shown by the green dotted shape in the figure), the student can also be part of the group that carries out a quality check for the instructor.

Not shown in the figure is the situation where learning materials created by a student during his/her learning process are added to the optimal mix by an instructor the next time the course is given.

A model for the networks of users of OER

Sharing and reuse of OER is done by individual instructors and students. Their actions are nevertheless influenced by the networks in which both categories of actors operate, in both a positive and a negative sense (as seen from the perspective of the adoption of OER). Vision and policy regarding OER will therefore also need to address those networks.

In this context, we distinguish two types of networks in which students and instructors function and which affect their views and activities regarding OER. First of all, every instructor and student is associated with at least one higher education institution. In addition, students and instructors work together in all kinds of contexts. When those relationships are institutional or semi-institutional, we refer to them as communities. Temporary collaborations, such as student workgroups that are formed for a course, are not included in our concept of communities.

Communities can exist within institutions, but also across institutions. Instructor communities can be discipline-oriented (for example, the Dutch Community of Practice Bachelor Nursing) or theme-oriented (for example, a community for educational video resources). There are also communities for supporting instructors and students in dealing with OER. Examples include the libraries’ Open Online Education working group or the various Special Interest Groups affiliated with SURF.

The following figure visualises the spheres of instructors, students, institutions and communities. It does not show the situation where an individual student or instructor is associated with more than one institution.

Click on the image to enlarge

In this figure, A, B and C are three institutions. The following situations can be distinguished:

  1. A community exists locally within an institution (1b in institution B or 1c in institution C). Examples: a course team within a department or a cross-faculty partnership of teaching staff in mathematics within one institution.
  2. A community of lecturers from two or more institutions (cross-institution community). In the figure, these are 2ab with institutions A and B and 2ac with institutions A and C respectively.
  3. Situation 3 at institution C shows the situation that instructors can be involved in more than one community.
  4. Community 4 at institution A consists of students. Example: a study association at a faculty.
  5. Community 5 is a cross-institutional community in which both instructors and students participate. An example is the so-called Centres of Expertise, in which students and instructors, but also researchers and entrepreneurs, work together to solve social challenges.

The example of community 5 illustrates that people other than teaching staff and students can also participate in communities. Support staff (educational experts, library staff and ICT experts) will often also be part of such communities.

Why these models?

In developing a vision and policy for the adoption of OER, it is important to focus on how and the context in which instructors and students create and use OER. Hodgkinson-Williams et al (2017:33) refer in this context to three kinds of dependencies:

  • the activity dependency
  • the context dependency
  • the concept dependency (the ideas and images people have).

In this contribution, we have outlined models for the first two types of dependencies: a process model for how instructors and students “deal” with digital learning resources and a concept model for the networks/context in which the “users” of digital open educational resources operate.

All kinds of factors play a role in activities and networks and these factors must also be addressed in an OER vision and policy. Examples include ownership of educational resources created (in part) by students or differing views regarding OER at institutions where instructors participate in a cross-institutional community. In a subsequent blog, we will clarify these and other issues and also formulate points of view from which a vision and policy for OERs can be drawn up.

Acknowledgements

The process model for assembling and using a mix of learning resources is based on an earlier version developed in the Acceleration Plan’s zone Towards Digital (Open) Educational Resources. The participants involved in formulating this model are to be thanked. In alphabetical order by surname, they are: Hans Beldhuis, Vincent de Boer, Cynthia van der Brugge, Michiel de Jong, Wouter Kleijheeg, Gerlien Klein, Gaby Lutgens, Marijn Post, Lieke Rensink, Arjan Schalken, Frederike Vernimmen – de Jong and Nicole Will.

References

Annand, D. (2015). Developing a sustainable financial model in higher education for open educational resources. The International Review of Research in Open and Distributed Learning16(5). https://doi.org/10.19173/irrodl.v16i5.2133

Hodgkinson-Williams, C., Arinto, P. B., Cartmill, T. & King, T. (2017). Factors influencing Open Educational Practices and OER in the Global South: Meta-synthesis of the ROER4D project. In C. Hodgkinson-Williams & P. B. Arinto (Eds.), Adoption and impact of OER in the Global South (pp. 27–67). DOI https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.1037088

Schuwer, R., Baas, M. & De Ruijter, A. (2021). De student gaat op zoek: de waarde van (open) leermaterialen voor het eigen leren. In: Baas, M., Jacobi, R., & Schuwer, R. (eds). Thema-uitgave hergebruik van open leermaterialen (pp 17-22). SURF, Nederland. https://communities.surf.nl/files/Artikel/download/Thema-uitgave%20hergebruik%20van%20leermaterialen_2mrt2021.pdf

Tlili, A., Nascimbeni, F., Burgos, D., Zhang, X., Huang, R., & Chang, T. (2020). The evolution of sustainability models for open educational resources: Insights from the literature and experts. Interactive Learning Environments, 1-16. https://doi.org/10.1080/10494820.2020.1839507

Wiley, D. (2007). On the Sustainability of Open Educational Resource Initiatives in Higher Education. Paper commissioned by the OECD’s Centre for Educational Research and Innovation (CERI) for the project on Open Educational Resources. http://www.oecd.org/education/ceri/38645447.pdf


This blog is contribution 3 in a series entitled A principled, pragmatic view of institutional OER policy. Previous contributions:

To be published:

  • Why are OER important? The value of OER from various perspectives
  • The need for a vision and policy regarding OER at both institutional and community of practice level

Processen en netwerken rond digitale leermaterialen

Deze blog is een coproductie van Ben Janssen (OpenEd Consult) en mij. Version in English.

Deze serie blogs heeft tot doel argumenten aan te dragen die van belang kunnen zijn bij het formuleren van visie op en beleid voor open leermaterialen. Visie en beleid zijn nodig om adoptie van open leermaterialen duurzaam maken. Veel initiatieven rond open leermaterialen starten met een initiële (project)subsidie, maar stranden als het project beëindigd is (Tlili et al, 2020; Annand, 2015). Parafraserend formuleren we dit ook wel als “Is er leven na de projectsubsidie?”. David Wiley (2007) heeft in advies voor de OECD aangegeven dat er rond duurzaamheid van open leermaterialen onderscheid gemaakt kan worden tussen twee vraagstukken:

  1. Hoe kan productie en delen van open leermaterialen duurzaam worden gemaakt?
  2. Hoe kan (her)gebruik van open leermaterialen door eindgebruikers duurzaam worden gemaakt?

Visieontwikkeling en beleid zullen beide vraagstukken moeten adresseren.

In de vorige blog hebben we een raamwerk voor ordening van typen digitale leermaterialen gepresenteerd om de plaats die open leermaterialen daarin inneemt te kunnen duiden. In deze blog presenteren we twee modellen, respectievelijk een procesmodel voor hoe docenten en studenten ‘omgaan met’ digitale leermaterialen en een denkmodel voor de netwerken/context waarin de ‘gebruikers’ van digitale open leermaterialen opereren. Visie op en beleid voor open leermaterialen zullen met beide zaken – de praktijken van gebruikers en de netwerken waarin de gebruikers opereren – rekening moeten houden (Tlili et al, 2020).

Een procesmodel voor het gebruik van digitale leermaterialen

In de zone Naar digitale (open) leermaterialen van het Versnellingsplan is een procesmodel ontwikkeld om een goed beeld te krijgen van hoe het gebruik van digitale leermaterialen er in de praktijk uitziet.

Als basis voor dit procesmodel diende het model van Hodgkinson-Williams et al (2017) voor de levenscyclus van open leermaterialen. De aanpassingen behelzen dat semi-open en commerciële leermaterialen ook zijn meegenomen, alsook de rol van de student. De aanpassingen zijn ontstaan op basis van observaties en ervaringen van de leden van de zone.

Het procesmodel geeft de activiteiten weer die een docent en een student ondernemen om te komen tot een voor hen optimale mix van leermaterialen. “Optimale mix” wordt opgevat als die mix van leermaterialen die, naar de mening van docent of student, het beste zijn of haar onderwijs- en leerproces ondersteunt dat moet leiden tot het behalen van de leeruitkomsten.

Bij het procesmodel worden twee scenario’s onderscheiden:

  1. Scenario 1: de literatuurlijst. De docent stelt een volgens hem of haar optimale mix samen voor zowel het te ondersteunen leerproces bij de student als voor gebruik in zijn of haar onderwijsproces. De docent bepaalt welke leermaterialen verplicht worden voorgeschreven en eventueel ook aanvullend worden aanbevolen. De student gaat uit van die leermaterialen om zijn/haar optimale mix samen te stellen. De communicatie over leermaterialen tussen docent en student gebeurt veelal via een door de docent samengestelde lijst van verplicht en optioneel te bestuderen leermateriaal (“de literatuurlijst”).
  2. Scenario 2: de instructie. De docent omschrijft een opdracht en geeft doorgaans een lijst van aanbevolen literatuur (in sommige instellingen ook wel referentielijst genoemd) mee. De communicatie over leermaterialen tussen de docent en student verloopt diffuser dan bij scenario 1. Initieel ligt er minimaal een instructie van de docent aan de student die mede richting geeft aan de voor een student optimale mix van leermaterialen (“de instructie”).

Scenario 1: de literatuurlijst

In figuur 1 is het procesmodel weergegeven voor scenario 1.

Figuur 1. Creatie optimale mix van leermaterialen, procesmodel voor scenario literatuurlijst. Klik op de afbeelding voor een vergroting

Een docent gaat een mix van leermaterialen samenstellen, optimaal passend bij de te realiseren leeruitkomsten en het eigen onderwijsproces. Dat samenstellen wordt gevisualiseerd door de gestippelde vorm in de afbeelding. Daarbij zoekt de docent naar leermaterialen, die zowel open als gesloten kunnen zijn. Die leermaterialen kunnen al in zijn of haar bezit zijn (in een prive database, meestal een harde schijf), een lokale database (bijvoorbeeld een vakgroeps- of instellingsrepository van leermaterialen, vaak een gedeelde netwerkschijf) of in “de cloud”. In veel gevallen zal een docent ook leermaterialen maken, waaronder ook mixes en aanpassing van elders gevonden leermaterialen wordt verstaan. De mix van leermaterialen zal een kwaliteitscontrole ondergaan, al dan niet expliciet. Deze kwaliteitscontrole kan ook plaatsvinden door anderen dan de docent (bijvoorbeeld door directe collega’s). Uiteindelijk zal de mix van leermaterialen ofwel worden gepubliceerd (beschikbaar worden gemaakt voor de studenten), ofwel worden gebruikt bij de onderwijsactiviteiten. In dat laatste geval kan het zijn dat die materialen niet beschikbaar komen voor studenten. Denk bijvoorbeeld aan een video die in de collegezaal wordt vertoond, maar die niet verder verspreid wordt. Het kan ook zijn dat leermaterialen die bij de onderwijsactiviteit worden gebruikt ook beschikbaar komen voor studenten. Denk  bijvoorbeeld aan kopieën van de slides die de docent in het onderwijs gebruikt. Onder publiceren van de optimale mix van leermaterialen valt in ieder geval het aangeven van de titels van leermaterialen (veelal tekstboeken) die, al dan niet verplicht, moeten worden bestudeerd (de literatuurlijst).

Ervaringen met gebruik van leermaterialen kunnen input zijn voor een kwaliteitscontrole en eventueel leiden tot aanpassing van de optimale mix, tijdens of na de cursus waarvoor de optimale mix is samengesteld. Denk bijvoorbeeld aan een situatie waarbij studenten tijdens een onderwijsactiviteit aangeven de voorkennis die de docent als aanwezig veronderstelde, niet bezitten. De docent kan dan de optimale mix aanvullen met leermaterialen die in de kennislacune voorzien. Feedback op de kwaliteit door studenten kan ook plaatsvinden via een cursusevaluatie (is in de figuur weergegeven met de gestippelde pijl).

Een student gaat, uitgaande van de gepubliceerde mix van leermaterialen (waaronder de literatuurlijst), zijn of haar eigen mix van leermaterialen samenstellen. Tijdens bestuderen of tijdens een onderwijsactiviteit kan de student additionele leermaterialen zoeken of maken en die aan zijn of haar optimale mix van leermaterialen toevoegen. Kwaliteitscontrole zal naar verwachting impliciet zijn en gebaseerd zijn op de bruikbaarheid die de student ervaart om de geformuleerde leerdoelen te behalen. Denk bijvoorbeeld aan ervaringen die de student heeft bij het maken van oefeningen om een bepaald wiskundig concept te beheersen. Wanneer de student daarbij niet in staat is alle oefeningen te maken zal hij of zij op zoek gaan naar additionele bronnen om blijkbaar nog niet aanwezige kennis op te doen. In (Schuwer, Baas & De Ruijter, 2021) zijn dergelijke praktijken in meer detail beschreven.

Een student kan eventueel besluiten delen van zijn of haar mix te publiceren voor derden. Denk bijvoorbeeld aan beschikbaar stellen van college-aantekeningen aan collega-studenten in een studievereniging.

Scenario 2: de instructie

Het procesmodel voor scenario 2 is weergegeven in figuur 2.

Figuur 2. Creatie optimale mix van leermaterialen, procesmodel voor scenario instructie. Klik op de afbeelding voor een vergroting

De activiteiten komen voor een groot deel overeen zoals beschreven bij scenario 1. De docent omschrijft een opdracht. Eventueel wordt een lijst van aanbevolen literatuur voor bij het uitvoeren van de opdracht samengesteld en, indien nodig, maakt de docent ook leermateriaal. Dit geheel wordt gepubliceerd en aan studenten ter beschikking gesteld (de instructie). Wat bij scenario 1 is geschreven over kwaliteitscontrole aan docentzijde, is ook in dit scenario van toepassing. Op basis van de instructie gaat de student aan de slag met het samenstellen van zijn of haar optimale mix van leermaterialen.

In dit scenario kunnen studenten ook zelf (leer)materialen publiceren (open of semi-open), zowel in een lokale opslag als in “de cloud”. De student zal dan ook toegang hebben tot de lokale opslag voor materialen in zijn of haar optimale mix. Deze situatie ontstaat bijvoorbeeld wanneer studenten leermaterialen creëren en publiceren als onderdeel van hun leerproces. Dergelijke didactische werkvormen kenmerken onderwijskundige aanpakken als Open Pedagogy en Open Educational Practices. Kwaliteitscontrole op de te publiceren materialen kan plaatsvinden door zowel de docent als de student. Andersom kan een student, wanneer docent en studenten gezamenlijk leermaterialen maken en publiceren (weergegeven door de groen gestippelde vorm in de figuur), ook deel uitmaken van de groep die een kwaliteitscontrole uitvoert voor de docent.

Niet in de figuur aangegeven is de situatie waarbij leermaterialen die een student creëert tijdens zijn of haar leerproces door een docent worden toegevoegd aan de optimale mix bij een volgende uitvoering van de cursus.

Een model voor de netwerken van gebruikers van open leermaterialen

Delen en hergebruiken van open leermateriaal gebeurt door individuele docenten en studenten. Hun handelen wordt evenwel beïnvloed door de netwerken waarin beide categorieën actoren zich bevinden, zowel in (vanuit adoptie van open leermaterialen oogpunt bekeken) positieve als negatieve zin. Visie op en beleid voor open leermaterialen zullen daarom ook die netwerken moeten adresseren.

We onderscheiden in dit verband twee soorten netwerken waarin studenten en docenten functioneren en die raken aan visie op en beleid voor open leermaterialen. Allereerst is iedere docent en student verbonden aan tenminste één instelling voor hoger onderwijs. Daarnaast werken studenten en docenten in allerlei verbanden samen. Wanneer deze verbanden een institutioneel of semi-institutioneel karakter hebben, betitelen wij deze als ‘community’. Tijdelijke samenwerkingen zoals studentwerkgroepen die voor een cursus worden gevormd nemen we dus niet mee in onze opvatting over community’s.

Community’s kunnen binnen instellingen bestaan, maar ook instellingsoverstijgend. Docentcommunity’s kunnen vakgebiedsgeoriënteerd zijn (zoals de Community of Practice Bachelor Nursing) of thema-georiënteerd (bijvoorbeeld een community voor video leermaterialen). Daarnaast zijn er community’s voor ondersteuning van docenten en studenten bij omgaan met open leermateriaal. Denk bijvoorbeeld aan de werkgroep Open online onderwijs van de bibliotheken of de diverse Special Interest Groups die aan SURF zijn gelieerd.

De volgende figuur visualiseert het veld van docenten, studenten, instellingen en community’s. Hierin is niet de situatie gevisualiseerd waarbij een individuele student of docent aan meer dan één instelling is verbonden.

Klik op de afbeelding voor een vergroting

In deze figuur zijn A, B en C drie instellingen. De volgende situaties kunnen worden onderkend:

  1. Een community bestaat lokaal binnen een instelling (1b in instelling B resp. 1c in instelling C). Voorbeelden: een cursusteam binnen een vakgroep of een faculteitsoverstijgend samenwerkingsverband van docenten wiskunde binnen één instelling.
  2. Een community van docenten van twee of meer instellingen (instellingsoverstijgende community). In de figuur zijn dat 2ab met instellingen A en B resp. 2ac met instellingen A en C.
  3. Situatie 3 in instelling C geeft de situatie weer dat docenten aan meerdere community’s verbonden kunnen zijn.
  4. Community 4 in instelling A wordt gevormd door studenten. Voorbeeld: een studievereniging bij een faculteit.
  5. Community 5 is een instellingsoverstijgende community waarin zowel docenten als studenten participeren. Een voorbeeld zijn de zgn. Centres of Expertise, waar studenten en docenten, maar ook onderzoekers en ondernemers samenwerken aan oplossen van maatschappelijke uitdagingen.

Het voorbeeld bij community 5 illustreert dat ook anderen dan docenten en studenten kunnen participeren in community’s. Zo zal veelal ook ondersteunende staf (onderwijskundigen, medewerkers uit bibliotheek- en mediatheek en ICT-deskundigen) deel uitmaken van dergelijke community’s.

Waarom deze modellen?

In visie- en beleidsontwikkeling gericht op de adoptie van open leermaterialen is het van groot belang om aandacht te geven aan hoe en de context waarin docenten en studenten open leermaterialen maken en gebruiken. Hodgkinson-Williams et al (2017:33) spreken in dit verband over drie soorten afhankelijkheden die een rol spelen:

  • de activiteit-afhankelijkheid
  • de context-afhankelijkheid
  • de concept-afhankelijkheid (de ideeën en beelden die mensen hebben).

Voor de eerste twee typen afhankelijkheid hebben we in deze bijdrage modellen geschetst: een procesmodel voor hoe docenten en studenten ‘omgaan met’ digitale leermaterialen en een denkmodel voor de netwerken/context waarin de ‘gebruikers’ van digitale open leermaterialen opereren.

In activiteiten en netwerken spelen allerlei factoren een rol die ook in een visie op en beleid voor open leermaterialen geadresseerd moeten worden. Denk aan eigenaarschap van (mede) door studenten gecreëerd leermateriaal of afwijkende visies op open leermaterialen bij instellingen waarvan docenten in een instellingsoverstijgende community participeren. In een volgende blog zetten we deze en andere issues op een rijtje en formuleren we ook gezichtspunten van waaruit een visie op en beleid voor open leermaterialen kan worden opgesteld.

Dankwoord

Het procesmodel voor samenstellen en gebruiken van een mix van leermaterialen is gebaseerd op een eerdere versie die is ontwikkeld in de zone Naar digitale (open) leermaterialen van het Versnellingsplan. Dank gaat uit naar de deelnemers die betrokken zijn geweest bij het formuleren van dit model. In alfabetische volgorde op achternaam waren dat: Hans Beldhuis, Vincent de Boer, Cynthia van der Brugge, Michiel de Jong, Wouter Kleijheeg, Gerlien Klein, Gaby Lutgens, Marijn Post, Lieke Rensink, Arjan Schalken, Frederike Vernimmen – de Jong en Nicole Will.

Referenties

Annand, D. (2015). Developing a sustainable financial model in higher education for open educational resources. The International Review of Research in Open and Distributed Learning16(5). https://doi.org/10.19173/irrodl.v16i5.2133

Hodgkinson-Williams, C., Arinto, P. B., Cartmill, T. & King, T. (2017). Factors influencing Open Educational Practices and OER in the Global South: Meta-synthesis of the ROER4D project. In C. Hodgkinson-Williams & P. B. Arinto (Eds.), Adoption and impact of OER in the Global South (pp. 27–67). DOI https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.1037088

Schuwer, R., Baas, M. & De Ruijter, A. (2021). De student gaat op zoek: de waarde van (open) leermaterialen voor het eigen leren. In: Baas, M., Jacobi, R., & Schuwer, R. (eds). Thema-uitgave hergebruik van open leermaterialen (pp 17-22). SURF, Nederland. https://communities.surf.nl/files/Artikel/download/Thema-uitgave%20hergebruik%20van%20leermaterialen_2mrt2021.pdf

Tlili, A., Nascimbeni, F., Burgos, D., Zhang, X., Huang, R., & Chang, T. (2020). The evolution of sustainability models for open educational resources: Insights from the literature and experts. Interactive Learning Environments, 1-16. https://doi.org/10.1080/10494820.2020.1839507

Wiley, D. (2007). On the Sustainability of Open Educational Resource Initiatives in Higher Education. Paper commissioned by the OECD’s Centre for Educational Research and Innovation (CERI) for the project on Open Educational Resources. http://www.oecd.org/education/ceri/38645447.pdf


Deze blog is bijdrage 3 in een serie Een principieel-pragmatische visie op institutioneel OER-beleid. Eerdere bijdragen:

Nog te verschijnen:

  • Waarom zijn open leermaterialen van belang? De waarde van open leermaterialen vanuit verschillende optieken
  • De noodzaak van visie en beleid met betrekking tot open leermaterialen op instellingsniveau en op het niveau van een community of practice

A framework for classifying types of digital learning materials

This blog post is a co-production of Ben Janssen (OpenEd Consult) and me. Nederlandse versie.

Many have attempted to provide a conclusive definition of digital learning resources. In the study by ResearchNed (Janssen & Van Casteren, 2020), the following pragmatic description of digital learning resources was used (p. 9):

“Learning resources are a subset of educational tools. Educational tools include anything used by instructors and/or students (including computers, electronic learning environments and smart boards) in and for the purpose of teaching or learning. The term learning resources refers only to learning content in a particular form (textual, visual, auditory, or a mix of these forms).

‘Digital learning resources’ means any digital resource that is used as teaching or learning content by instructors and/or students in the course of a teaching or learning process. A digital resource is a resource that exists in binary numerical form, such as digital audio or digital images (this also includes the ‘book behind glass’, pdf).

Educational tools such as digital whiteboards, VR glasses, but also digital assessment tools, platforms or online discussion forums, do not fall under our description of learning resources. E.g., YouTube as a platform is not included, but the videos that are placed on YouTube and used as learning resources are.”

The following non-exhaustive list of digital learning resources is provided for illustrative purposes

digital study- and handbooks, among which (open) textbooksanimations
digital (scientific) publicationswiki’s
(PowerPoint)presentations/sheets/slideshowsYouTube video’s
digital syllabi, summaries, manuals of lectures and practicadigital images, including 3D visualisations
weblectures and slidecastsdigital newspaper articles/news sources/archivestv-uitzendingen
digital assessmentspodcasts
digital internship and assignment reportsblogs
videos, including knowledge clips, tutorials, instructional videos, vodcasts, animations and documentariesopen content and data on websites, such as reports from the Parliament and reports from policymakers and research committees
AR- en VR-applicationsdata from databases such as Skybray, BBC Monitoring, Factiva
MOOCs, SPOCs, Open Educational Resourcesessays in digital form
infographicsnovels in digital form

We are interested in digital open learning resources, not so much in what they are but more in what you can and cannot do with them. Using a dichotomy of open versus closed is insufficient for that purpose. Concepts like semi-open resources and commercial resources are also useful for the activities in the Acceleration Plan. But how do these two concepts relate to one another and to OER?

We propose a differentiated categorisation of digital learning resources that gives guidance for institutional policy development. This framework is an extension from what David Wiley has presented (source, p. 26).

Digital learning resources can be categorized using two dimensions:

  1. Access
    • no restrictions (open access), for everyone
    • non-financial restrictions, for everyone
    • non-financial restrictions, not for everyone (walled garden)
    • financial restrictions
  2. Adaptation rights
    • Adaptable (users have permission to adapt)
    • Non-adaptable (users have no permission to adapt)

Learning resources with access without financial restrictions are called free learning resources. The following figure is a graphical representation of our framework.

Click on the image to enlarge

Some background information to this framework:

  • For the open learning resources (without restrictions or with non-financial restrictions), adaptation rights are ordered from most (100%) to no rights to adapt. Licenses provide the conditions for adaptation. In the figure we have adopted the commonly used Creative Commons licenses. These licenses are about the rights creators give to others to retain, use, adapt and distribute their works and the conditions to be met when exercising those rights. The licences do not cover restrictions on access to the works.
  • The figure also shows that two Creative Commons licences do not grant rights of adaptation due to the ND (Non Derivative) condition.
  • Preference for a combination of rights of adaptation and access are context dependent. E.g. a lecturer can prefer adaptable learning materials, but will be indifferent on access. A learner will in many cases only be interested in free access and not in adaptability. But the same learner can, when pedagogy makes it necessary, also be interested in adaptability. Think e.g. about practices of open pedagogy (for examples, see the Open Pedagogy Notebook)
  • The most common non-financial restriction when access for everyone is available is the obligation to create a free account to get access.
  • The most common situation for non-financial restrictions, access not for everyone is membership of a group (institution, community of practice).
  • We have chosen for a pragmatic view on openness to widen adoption of sharing and reusing. Issues like technical openness (only open source tools and platforms are allowed to access the learning material) or content requirements (e.g. inclusive, accessible to people with disabilities) have not been considered.
  • The size of each area does not reflect a relative importance or a personal preference of that area, compared to the other areas

This framework allows us to position the different types of learning resources mentioned in the Acceleration Plan as “open”, “semi-open”, “closed”, “commercial” in relation to each other.

As far as we know, there seems to be a generally accepted definition only for the category “Open Educational Resources”. Here we use this definition in the formulation of Creative Commons.

Open Educational Resources (OER) are teaching, learning, and research materials that are either (a) in the public domain or (b) licensed in a manner that provides everyone with free and perpetual permission to engage in the 5R activities:

  • Retain – make, own, and control a copy of the resource
  • Reuse – use your original, revised, or remixed copy of the resource publicly
  • Revise – edit, adapt, and modify your copy of the resource
  • Remix – combine your original or revised copy of the resource with other existing material to create something new
  • Redistribute – share copies of your original, revised, or remixed copy of the resource with others”

This definition is a.o. adopted by the Hewlett Foundation.

In terms of the framework, we define the terms used in the Acceleration Plan as follows:

  • Semi-open resources are teaching, learning, and research resources that are available to a limited group of persons and eventually licensed in a manner that provides everyone in this group with free and perpetual permission to engage in the 5R activities, be it with the restriction that redistribution happens only within the limited group.
  • Commercial resources are teaching, learning, and research resources that are only available under financial restrictions.
  • Closed resources are teaching, learning, and research resources that are unavailable for a person or a group of persons. This definition is dependent on the perspective of the stakeholder. E.g. semi-open learning resources, available for a group, appear to be closed for persons outside of that group.

In the next figure we have positioned the sets of OER, semi-open learning resources and commercial learning resources in the framework.

Click on the image to enlarge

To illustrate the framework, we have added some examples.

Click on the image to enlarge

In the next blog we will focus on ecosystems for (semi-)open learning resources and issues we encounter.

Reference

Janssen, B. & Van Casteren, W. (2020): Digitale leermaterialen in het hoger onderwijs. Onderzoek in opdracht van het Koersteam Versnellingsplan Onderwijsinnovatie met ICT. Utrecht: Versnellingsplan Onderwijsinnovatie met ICT.


This blog is contribution 2 in a series entitled A principled, pragmatic view of institutional OER policy. Previous contribution:

Introduction

To be published:

  • What is the playing field on OER? A systems approach
  • Why are OER important? The value of OER from various perspectives
  • The need for a vision and policy regarding OER at both institutional and community of practice level

 

Een raamwerk voor ordenen van typen digitale leermaterialen

Photo by kazuend on Unsplash

Deze blog is een coproductie van Ben Janssen (OpenEd Consult) en mij. Version in English.

Velen hebben geprobeerd een sluitende definitie te geven van digitale leermaterialen. In de studie van ResearchNed (Janssen & Van Casteren, 2020) is de volgende pragmatische omschrijving van digitale leermaterialen gebruikt (p. 9):

“Leermaterialen zijn een deelverzameling van leermiddelen. Onder leermiddelen valt alles wat door docenten en/of studenten wordt gebruikt (ook computers, elektronische leeromgevingen (ELO’s) en smartboards) in en ten behoeve van het onderwijs of een leerproces. De term leermaterialen betreft enkel leerstof of leerinhoud (content) in een bepaalde vorm (tekstueel, visueel, auditief of een mix van deze vormen).

Met digitale leermaterialen wordt bedoeld elke digitale bron die als leerstof of leerinhoud (content) door docenten en/of studenten wordt gebruikt in het onderwijs of een leerproces. Een digitale bron is een bron die bestaat in binaire numerieke vorm, zoals in digitale audio of digitale beelden (hieronder valt ook het ‘boek achter glas’, pdf).

Leermiddelen zoals digitale whiteboards, VR-brillen, maar ook digitale evaluatietools, platforms of online discussiefora, vallen niet onder onze omschrijving. Ter volledigheid: YouTube als platform valt hier niet onder, de video’s die op YouTube geplaatst zijn en gebruikt worden als leermaterialen wel.”

Ter illustratie een niet-limitatieve opsomming van digitale leermaterialen.

digitale studie- en handboeken, waaronder (open) textbooksWiki’s
digitale (wetenschappelijke) artikelenYouTube video’s
(PowerPoint)presentaties/sheets/slideshowsdigitale afbeeldingen, waaronder 3D-visualisaties
digitale syllabi, samenvattingen, manuals van (hoor)colleges en practicadigitale krantenartikelen/nieuwsbronnen/archieven
webcolleges en slidecaststv-uitzendingen
digitale toetsenpodcasts
digitale stage- en opdrachtverslagenblogs
video’s, waaronder kennisclips, tutorials, instructievideo’s, vodcasts, animaties en documentairesopen content en data op websites, zoals verslagen van de Tweede Kamer en rapporten van beleidsmakers en onderzoekscommissies
AR- en VR-applicatiesdata uit databases zoals Skybray, BBC Monitoring, Factiva
MOOCs, SPOCs, Open Educational Resourcesessays in digitale vorm
infographicsromans in digitale vorm
animaties

Wij zijn geïnteresseerd in digitale open leermaterialen, niet zozeer in wat het zijn, maar vooral in wat je ermee mag en kan. De tweedeling open versus gesloten is onvoldoende daarvoor. Ook blijken begrippen als semi-open leermateriaal en commercieel leermateriaal voor de activiteiten in het Versnellingsplan nuttig te zijn. Maar hoe verhouden deze begrippen zich tot elkaar en tot open leermaterialen?

Wij stellen hier een gedifferentieerde categorisatie van digitale leermaterialen voor die handvatten geeft voor ontwikkeling van institutioneel beleid. Deze indeling is een uitbreiding van het raamwerk dat David Wiley heeft ontwikkeld (bron, p. 26).

Digitale leermaterialen kunnen worden onderverdeeld naar twee dimensies:

  1. Toegang
    • geen beperkingen (open access), voor iedereen
    • niet-financiële beperkingen, voor iedereen
    • niet-financiële beperkingen, voor een beperkte groep (walled garden)
    • financiële beperkingen
  2. Rechten op aanpassing
    • aanpasbaar (gebruikers hebben toestemming tot aanpassing)
    • niet-aanpasbaar (gebruikers hebben geen toestemming tot aanpassing)

Leermateriaal dat zonder financiële beperkingen toegankelijk is, wordt gratis of vrij toegankelijk leermateriaal genoemd. In de volgende figuur staat een grafische voorstelling van ons raamwerk.

Klik op de afbeelding voor een vergroting

Achtergrondinformatie bij dit raamwerk:

  • Voor het open leermateriaal (zonder beperkingen of met niet-financiële beperkingen) zijn de aanpassingsrechten gerangschikt van meest (100%) tot geen rechten om aan te passen. Licenties bieden de voorwaarden voor aanpassing. In de figuur hebben we de veelgebruikte Creative Commons-licenties overgenomen. Deze licenties gaan over de rechten die makers aan anderen geven om hun werken te behouden, te gebruiken, aan te passen en te verspreiden en de voorwaarden waaraan moet worden voldaan wanneer van die rechten gebruik wordt gemaakt. De licenties gaan niet over de beperkingen op de toegankelijkheid tot de werken.
  • In de figuur is ook te zien dat twee Creative Commons licenties geen rechten op aanpassing geven door de ND (Non Derivative) voorwaarde.
  • Voorkeuren voor een combinatie van aanpassings- en toegangsrechten zijn afhankelijk van de context. Een docent kan bijvoorbeeld de voorkeur geven aan aanpasbaar leermateriaal, en kan onverschillig staan tegenover al dan niet vrije toegang. Een lerende zal in veel gevallen alleen geïnteresseerd zijn in vrije toegang en niet in aanpasbaarheid. Maar diezelfde lerende kan, wanneer de didactische werkvorm dat noodzakelijk maakt, ook geïnteresseerd zijn in aanpasbaarheid. Denk bijvoorbeeld aan praktijken van open pedagogy (voor voorbeelden, zie het Open Pedagogy Notebook).
  • Een veel voorkomende niet-financiële beperking wanneer toegang voor iedereen beschikbaar is, is de verplichting om een gratis account aan te maken om toegang te krijgen.
  • De meest voorkomende situatie voor niet-financiële beperkingen, met toegang voor een beperkte groep, is lidmaatschap van een groep (instelling of (vak)community).
  • Wij hebben gekozen voor een pragmatische kijk op openheid om de adoptie van delen en hergebruiken te verbreden. Kwesties als technische openheid (voor toegang tot het leermateriaal zijn alleen open source tools en platforms toegestaan) of eisen aan inhoud (bv. inclusief, toegankelijk voor mensen met een beperking) zijn buiten beschouwing gelaten.
  • De grootte van een vlak geeft geen relatief belang of een persoonlijke voorkeur van dat vlak ten opzichte van de andere vlakken weer.

Dit raamwerk stelt ons in staat om de verschillende soorten leermaterialen die in het Versnellingsplan genoemd worden zoals “open”, “semi-open”, “gesloten”, “commercieel”,  ten opzichte van elkaar te positioneren.

Voor zover wij weten lijkt alleen voor de categorie “Open Educational Resources” een algemeen gangbare definitie te bestaan. Hier gebruiken wij deze definitie in de formulering van Creative Commons.

Open Educational Resources (OER) are teaching, learning, and research materials that are either (a) in the public domain or (b) licensed in a manner that provides everyone with free and perpetual permission to engage in the 5R activities:

  • Retain – make, own, and control a copy of the resource
  • Reuse – use your original, revised, or remixed copy of the resource publicly
  • Revise – edit, adapt, and modify your copy of the resource
  • Remix – combine your original or revised copy of the resource with other existing material to create something new
  • Redistribute – share copies of your original, revised, or remixed copy of the resource with others”

Deze definitie wordt o.a. gebruikt door de Hewlett Foundation.

In termen van het raamwerk definiëren we de in het Versnellingsplan gebruikte termen als volgt:

  • Semi-open materialen zijn onderwijs-, leer-, en onderzoeksmaterialen die beschikbaar zijn voor een beperkte groep personen en uiteindelijk in licentie worden gegeven op een manier die iedereen in deze groep gratis en eeuwigdurend toestemming geeft om de 5R-activiteiten uit te voeren, zij het met de restrictie dat herverspreiding alleen binnen de beperkte groep gebeurt.
  • Commercieel materiaal is onderwijs-, leer- en onderzoeksmateriaal dat alleen beschikbaar is onder financiële beperkingen.
  • Gesloten materiaal is onderwijs-, leer- en onderzoeksmateriaal dat niet beschikbaar is voor een persoon of een groep personen. Deze definitie is afhankelijk van het perspectief van de belanghebbende. Bv. semi-open leermateriaal, beschikbaar voor een groep, is gesloten voor personen buiten die groep.

In de volgende figuur hebben we de verzamelingen van OER, semi-open leermaterialen en commerciële leermaterialen in het raamwerk gepositioneerd.

Klik op de afbeelding voor een vergroting

Om het raamwerk te illustreren, hebben wij enkele voorbeelden toegevoegd.

Klik op de afbeelding voor een vergroting

We willen in het bijzonder wijzen op het voorbeeld “Default voor websites” linksonder in de figuur. Indien op een website geen verdere mededelingen over gebruik ervan te vinden is gelden de voorwaarden “Geen beperkingen op toegang” en “All Rights Reserved” (bron). We vermoeden dat onbekendheid met deze regel in de praktijk van hergebruik van leermateriaal de oorzaak is van veel schendingen op copyright.

In de volgende blog zullen we ons richten op ecosystemen voor (semi-)open leermaterialen en de problemen die we daarbij tegenkomen.

Referentie

Janssen, B. & Van Casteren, W. (2020): Digitale leermaterialen in het hoger onderwijs. Onderzoek in opdracht van het Koersteam Versnellingsplan Onderwijsinnovatie met ICT. Utrecht: Versnellingsplan Onderwijsinnovatie met ICT.


Deze blog is bijdrage 2 in een serie Een principieel-pragmatische visie op institutioneel OER-beleid. Eerdere bijdrage:

Nog te verschijnen:

  • Wat speelt rond open leermaterialen? Een systeembenadering
  • Waarom zijn open leermaterialen van belang? De waarde van open leermaterialen vanuit verschillende optieken
  • De noodzaak van visie en beleid met betrekking tot open leermaterialen op instellingsniveau en op het niveau van een community of practice

A principled pragmatic view of institutional OER policy

This blog post is a co-production of Ben Janssen (OpenEd Consult) and me. Nederlandse versie.

For years, we have been advocating the adoption of Open Educational Resources (OER) in publicly funded Dutch education. A study we both conducted in 2017 showed that adoption by the early and late majority of instructors is not yet widespread (Schuwer & Janssen, 2018). And in our view, the degree of adoption of OER in publicly funded Dutch higher education (i.e. funded education) is still too low to have any effect. There are more than enough indications to assert that the use of OER can have multiple positive innovative effects on and in higher education (see e.g. (Orr, Rimini & Van Damme, 2015)). In the Netherlands, this has been recognised in and by the The Acceleration Plan for Educational Innovation with IT (abbreviated as the Acceleration Plan). One of the themes of this plan is the use of digital (open) educational resources.

In the Acceleration Plan, Dutch publicly funded HE institutions, SURF, VSNU (Association of Research Universities in the Netherlands) and VH (Association of Universities of Applied Sciences) are working together to seize the opportunities digitalisation is offering to higher education in the Netherlands. The mission of the Acceleration Plan is to institutions take substantial steps in digitalisation of education, for themselves and in collaboration with others.

The Acceleration Plan is divided into eight Acceleration Zones, within which 39 Research Universities and Universities of Applied Sciences collaborate on themes such as professionalisation of instructors, use of study data, making education more flexible, linking up with the labour market, and use of digital (open) learning resources. In the “Joint Steering for Acceleration” zone, seventeen university governors are having an executive dialogue about digitalisation in higher education, with special attention for the themes of the Acceleration Plan. More information about the Acceleration Plan.

In 2020, the research bureau ResearchNed (with Ben Janssen as lead researcher) conducted a study commissioned by the Joint Steering zone into the state of affairs regarding the use of digital learning resources in Dutch higher education. A public version of their report will soon be available (in Dutch). Based on the results, a working group of the digital (open) educational resources zone of the Acceleration Plan (in which Robert Schuwer participated) has drawn up a vision document for digital learning resources with a horizon on 2025.

Based on the results of both exercises, the Joint Steering zone is now working on two themes:

  1. Achieving a national set of agreements with publishers of digital learning materials regarding the use and ownership of user data.
  2. Formulating and implementing a fully-fledged open alternative for commercial learning materials.

The second theme requires institutions to develop an OER vision and policy.

In a series of blogs, we will present arguments that may be relevant in formulating such a vision and policy. Although we will focus primarily on higher education institutions, we believe that they can also be useful to umbrella organisations (VSNU and VH), SURF, and the Dutch Ministry of Education, Culture and Science. We base our approach on a principled view on OER but also aim for as much pragmatism as possible so as to maximise the direct applicability of the arguments. In the coming weeks, we will be publishing blogs on the following topics:

  1. What are we talking about when we use the term digital educational resources? A proposal for a terminology framework
  2. What are the issues with OERs? A systems approach
  3. Why are OER important? The value of OER from various perspectives
  4. The need for an OER vision and policy, both at institutional and communities of practice level.

 

Reference

Orr, D., Rimini, R., & Van Damme, D. (2015). Educational research and innovation open educational resources a catalyst for innovation: A catalyst for innovation. OECD Publishing. https://doi.org/10.1787/9789264247543-en

Schuwer, R., & Janssen, B. (2018). Adoption of sharing and reuse of open resources by educators in higher education institutions in The Netherlands: A qualitative research of practices, motives, and conditions. The International Review of Research in Open and Distributed Learning19(3). https://doi.org/10.19173/irrodl.v19i3.3390

Een principieel-pragmatische visie op institutioneel OER-beleid

Photo by Ethan Dow on Unsplash

Deze blog is een coproductie van Ben Janssen (OpenEd Consult) en mij. Version in English.

Al jaren bepleiten wij de adoptie van open leermaterialen (Open Educational Resources, OER) in het Nederlandse (bekostigde) onderwijs. Een onderzoek dat we beiden hebben uitgevoerd in 2017 wees uit dat adoptie door de early en late majority van docenten nog niet grootschalig gebeurt (Schuwer & Janssen, 2018). En nog steeds is de graad van adoptie van OER in het Nederlandse (bekostigde) hoger onderwijs in onze ogen te laag om effect te hebben. Er zijn meer dan voldoende aanwijzingen om te mogen stellen dat gebruik van OER meervoudige positieve innovatieve effecten op en in het hoger onderwijs kunnen hebben (zie b.v. (Orr, Rimini & Van Damme, 2015)). Dit is onderkend in en door het Versnellingsplan Onderwijsinnovatie met ICT (afgekort tot het Versnellingsplan). Daarin is een van de hoofdthema’s inzet van digitale (open) leermaterialen.

In het Versnellingsplan werken instellingen, SURF en de VSNU en VH samen aan benutten van de kansen die digitalisering aan het hoger onderwijs in Nederland biedt. De missie van het Versnellingsplan is om binnen de eigen instelling én in samenwerking met andere universiteiten en hogescholen, substantiële stappen te zetten op het gebied van digitalisering in het hoger onderwijs in Nederland.

Het Versnellingsplan is opgedeeld in acht Versnellingszones, waarbinnen 39 universiteiten en hogescholen samenwerken op thema’s als professionalisering van docenten, gebruik van studiedata, flexibilisering van het onderwijs, aansluiting op de arbeidsmarkt en de inzet van digitale (open) leermaterialen. In de zone “Gezamenlijk koersen op versnelling” (kortweg het Koersteam) voeren zeventien bestuurders van hogescholen en universiteiten een bestuurlijk gesprek over digitalisering in het hoger onderwijs, met speciale aandacht voor de thema’s van het Versnellingsplan. Meer informatie over het Versnellingsplan.

In 2020 heeft het onderzoeksbureau ResearchNed (met als hoofdonderzoeker Ben Janssen) in opdracht van het Koersteam een onderzoek uitgevoerd naar de stand van zaken rond gebruik van digitale leermaterialen in het Nederlandse hoger onderwijs. Een publieksversie van hun verslag zal binnenkort beschikbaar zijn. Op basis van de uitkomsten heeft een werkgroep van de zone Naar digitale (open) leermaterialen van het Versnellingsplan (waaraan Robert Schuwer deelnam) een visiedocument op digitale leermaterialen opgesteld met een horizon van 2025.

Op basis van de resultaten van beide exercities werkt het Koersteam aan twee thema’s:

  1. Komen tot een landelijke set van afspraken met uitgevers van digitale leermaterialen over o.a. gebruik en eigenaarschap van gebruiksdata
  2. Formuleren en implementeren van een volwaardig open alternatief voor commerciële leermaterialen

Voor het tweede thema is het nodig dat instellingen een visie en beleid op open leermaterialen ontwikkelen.

In een serie blogs zullen wij argumenten aandragen die van belang kunnen zijn bij het formuleren van zo’n visie en beleid. Hoewel we ons daarbij primair richten op instellingen voor hoger onderwijs denken we dat ze ook van nut kunnen zijn voor koepelorganisaties, SURF en het Ministerie van OCW. We baseren ons daarbij op een principiële invalshoek op open leermaterialen, maar streven ook naar zoveel mogelijk pragmatiek daarin om directe toepasbaarheid van de argumenten zo groot mogelijk te maken.

In de komende weken zullen we blogs publiceren over de volgende onderwerpen:

  1. Waar hebben het over als we het hebben over digitale leermaterialen? Een voorstel voor ordening.
  2. Wat speelt rond open leermaterialen? Een systeembenadering
  3. Waarom zijn open leermaterialen van belang? De waarde van open leermaterialen vanuit verschillende optieken
  4. De noodzaak van visie en beleid met betrekking tot open leermaterialen op instellingsniveau en op communityniveau

Referenties

Orr, D., Rimini, R., & Van Damme, D. (2015). Educational research and innovation open educational resources a catalyst for innovation: A catalyst for innovation. OECD Publishing. https://doi.org/10.1787/9789264247543-en

Schuwer, R., & Janssen, B. (2018). Adoption of sharing and reuse of open resources by educators in higher education institutions in The Netherlands: A qualitative research of practices, motives, and conditions. The International Review of Research in Open and Distributed Learning19(3). https://doi.org/10.19173/irrodl.v19i3.3390

UNESCO and COVID-19

In the past weeks, UNESCO has been busy with several activities to support education in the current COVID-19 crisis, with a specific focus on OER and OEP (Open Educational Practices). They have collected everything on a website. This website is regularly updated. Some resources on this website I find worthwhile.

  • Overview of national platforms and tools. Contains among many other things links to available (national) repositories of OER and national and local support sites. (*)
  • Overview of distance learning solutions to facilitate student learning and provide social care and interaction during periods of school closure.
  • Webinars on the educational dimensions of the COVID-19 pandemic. Those webinars provide a venue for stakeholders working in education to share practices, ideas and resources about country responses to school closures and other challenges stemming from the global health crisis.

(*) In the overview, The Netherlands is missing. Some sources I would recommend to add to this overview:

Also, more information about the Global Education Coalition can be found. From their press release:

Multilateral partners, including the International Labor Organization, the UN High Commission for Refugees, The United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), the World Health Organization, the World Bank, the World Food Programme and the International Telecommunication Union, as well as the Global Partnership for Education, Education Cannot Wait, the OIF (Organisation Internationale de la Francophonie) the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, and the Asian Development Bank have joined the Coalition, stressing the need for swift and coordinated support to countries in order to mitigate the adverse impacts of school closures, in particular for the most disadvantaged.

The private sector, including, Microsoft, GSMA, Weidong, Google, Facebook, Zoom, KPMG and Coursera have also joined the Coalition, contributing resources and their expertise around technology, notably connectivity, and capacity strengthening. Companies using learner and educational data have committed to uphold ethical standards.

Philanthropic and non-profit organizations, including Khan Academy, Dubai Cares, Profuturo and Sesame Street are also part of the Coalition, mobilizing their resources and services to support schools, teachers, parents and learners during this time of unparalleled educational disruption.

Media outlets are also invited to join the Coalition, as has done the BBC World Service as part of its commitment to supporting young people in lockdown across the globe. The BBC will be producing advice, stories, and media education materials to help isolated young people understand how the Coronavirus may affect them.

Their aim is:

Specifically, the Coalition aims to:

  • Help countries in mobilizing resources and implementing innovative and context-appropriate solutions to provide education remotely, leveraging hi-tech, low-tech and no-tech approaches
  • Seek equitable solutions and universal access
  • Ensure coordinated responses and avoid overlapping efforts
  • Facilitate the return of students to school when they reopen to avoid an upsurge in dropout rates

The involvement of the big (Ed)Tech companies in this coalition has raised some concerns (page 25-26). In his blog, Ben Janssen elaborates on this.

The UNESCO Institute for Information Technologies in Education (UNESCO IITE) and UNESCO International Research and Training Centre for Rural Education (UNESCO INRULED) have published a reportGuidance on Open Educational Practices during School Closures: Utilizing OER under COVID-19 Pandemic in line with UNESCO OER Recommendation. From the preface:

This publication is motivated and inspired by UNESCO OER Recommendations and the innovative experiences worldwide. It aims to show the implications of using Open Educational Practices (OEP) and Open Educational Resources (OER) on learning outcomes. Particularly, it describes, through illustrative examples, innovative approaches to using OEP and OER worldwide during COVID-19 outbreak.

The report can be used as a source of inspiration of how OER and OEP can create online and blended learning experiences. It provides an introduction in both elements, using the Recommendation on OER as structuring framework.

 

Learn about COVID-19

Open resources are very useful in the pivot to online education as has happened the past few weeks, due to the corona crisis. Many overviews of open resources aimed at supporting teachers and staff in this endeavour have been published and are still being published and updated. See my previous blogpost (in Dutch)  for some examples in the Netherlands.

But open resources are also useful for learning about the corona virus and the COVID-19 disease it causes. Several of these resources have been published the past few weeks. Here an overview of resources I found.

OpenWHO is the new interactive, web-based, knowledge-transfer platform of the World Health Organization, offering online courses to improve the response to health emergencies.

The open courses about COVID-19 are collected on one page. These are mostly real-time training courses about prevention, offered in several languages. The overview is regularly updated with new courses.
The website


Courses about COVID-19
Class Central maintains an overview of MOOCs about COVID-19, offered by several institutions around the world (e.g. Johns Hopkins University, University of Toronto, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine)The overview on Class Central
Science Matters: Let's Talk About COVID-19 of the Imperial College London is "about the theory behind the analyses of COVID-19 and its spread, while learning how to interpret new information using core principles of public health, epidemiology, medicine, health economics, and social science." The course is regularly updated with new insights. (3 study hours estimated)Course on the Coursera platform
Fighting COVID-19 with Epidemiology: A Johns Hopkins Teach-Out is "for anyone who has been curious about how we identify and measure outbreaks like the COVID-19 epidemic and wants to understand the epidemiology of these infections." (4 study hours estimated)Course on the Coursera platform
Coronavirus - What you need to know, offered by Alison, "focuses on the history, transmission, symptoms, possible treatment and potential prevention of the novel coronavirus." (1-2 hours estimated)Course on the Alison platform
The Dutch OER platform Wikiwijs has several resources available for primary, secondary, vocational and higher education. Most of the resources are in Dutch.Primary education
Secondary education
Vocational education
Higher education
SPARC Europe maintains an overview with several open initiatives to fight the virus, for research and to inform the community. This overview contains several valuable resources for teachers who want to create their own OER about this topic (e.g. datasets and data tools to fight Corona).Overview of SPARC Europe

Disclaimer: for sure, I can and will not guarantee the completeness of this overview.

 

Open in post-corona

CC0 Matthew Affflecat. https://pixabay.com/nl/illustrations/corona-virus-coronavirus-virus-4932576/
Gedwongen door de coronavirus pandemie is de afgelopen weken wereldwijd door velen keihard gewerkt om het mogelijk te maken onderwijs op afstand online aan te bieden. Websites met tips over tools, didactiek, ondersteuning voor ouders en good practices schoten als paddestoelen uit de grond, zowel op instellingsniveau als landelijk en mondiaal. In Nederland startte SURF een Vraagbaak online onderwijs en Kennisnet de website Les op afstand voor PO, VO en MBO en publiceerde UNESCO een website met tien tips voor leren op afstand. Open Educational Resources (OER) en (Massive) Open Online Courses ((M)OOC’s) worden als vrij toegankelijk beschikbaar digitaal leermateriaal ingezet, naast commercieel digitaal leermateriaal dat door diverse uitgevers gedurende deze crisis vrij toegankelijk wordt gemaakt. Zelf kreeg ik diverse vragen over vindplaatsen voor OER (waarbij ik als antwoord verwees naar de toolkit op mijn website) en (M)OOC’s (waarbij voor mij de portal Class Central met stip op 1 staat als startpunt voor zoeken). Een idee om colleges, zelf thuis opgenomen met een webcam, vrij toegankelijk beschikbaar te stellen leidde tot de website Quarantaine colleges. Op het moment van schrijven van deze post stonden 16 videos van colleges online, in tijd variërend van 7 minuten tot bijna 1,5 uur.

Maar er komen ook diverse pijnpunten naar boven:

  • een dreigende vergroting van de tweedeling in de maatschappij tussen leerlingen en studenten die in een thuissituatie goed ondersteund kunnen worden (voldoende IT-apparatuur beschikbaar en een omgeving die het leerproces kan ondersteunen) en degenen waar dat minder goed geregeld is;
  • docenten die een (didactische) aanpak van een face-2-face situatie 1-op-1 vertalen naar een online situatie (colleges, zelfde soort summatieve toetsing, verwachtingen van zelfde soort gedrag bij studenten online als die ze bij face-2-face onderwijs vertonen);
  • praktijkonderwijs is lastig om volledig online te geven;
  • De snelheid waarmee adoptie van de tools plaatsvindt en waarmee online brengen van digitale bronnen gebeurt gaat soms ten koste van aandacht privacy (AVG en de noodzaak voor verwerkersovereenkomsten met leveranciers van de tools) en auteursrechten die op bronnen kunnen rusten.

Daarnaast spelen ook gevoelens van angst voor de ziekte zelf en de onzekerheid over hoelang dit gaat duren en welke consequenties dit mogelijk economisch kan hebben een rol. Gevoelens die ongetwijfeld hun weerslag hebben op de onderwijs- en leerprocessen en de mentale weerbaarheid van docenten en studenten.

Mag hier desondanks gesproken worden over een adoptie van open online onderwijs en OER? Daar heb ik twijfels over. Inderdaad, voor velen zal deze gedwongen transitie naar volledig online de eerste ervaringen zijn met deze vorm van onderwijs en met OER. Dit zal met name gelden voor wat Rogers (2003) aanduidt als de Early en Late majority van docenten. Er is simpelweg geen alternatief beschikbaar, dus iedereen zal moeten roeien met de riemen die het heeft. Hergebruik van vrij toegankelijke bronnen (al dan niet met rechten van aanpassing onder voorwaarden die door de open licentie worden voorgeschreven) zal ongetwijfeld een grote groei kennen. Docenten en studenten zullen met name de snelle beschikbaarheid van deze bronnen als toegevoegde waarde in de huidige context ervaren.

Blijvende adoptie

Hoe kunnen we ervoor zorgen dat deze ervaringen in een post-corona tijdperk beklijven en leiden tot een blijvende vergroting van adoptie van OER? De sleutel hiervoor ligt in het bepalen van welke toegevoegde waarde docenten in een meer genormaliseerde situatie zullen ervaren bij een dergelijke adoptie. Uit diverse onderzoeken (waaronder mijn eigen onderzoek in (Schuwer & Janssen, 2018)) is al bekend dat, naast snelle beschikbaarheid, toegevoegde waarde op diverse vlakken wordt ervaren:

  • Institutionele voordelen (zoals marketing en exposure door open publiceren van bronnen, het bereiken van nieuwe doelgroepen (bijvoorbeeld professionals in de beroepsbevolking));
  • Financiële voordelen (bronnen die duur zijn om te maken (bv. MOOC’s) worden hergebruikt);
  • Educatieve voordelen (zoals het vermogen om blended learning beter te ondersteunen (met flipped classroom  als meest genoemde vorm), efficiëntie in het creëren van leermateriaal door hergebruik van bestaande bronnen, beter kunnen omgaan met diversiteit, het verbeteren van de kwaliteit van het leermateriaal (bijvoorbeeld door peer feedback op gedeelde materialen of in vakcommunities gezamenlijk ontwikkelen van materialen), en ultimo daardoor verbeteren van de kwaliteit van het onderwijs);
  • Persoonlijke voordelen (zoals erkenning, idealistische motieven en tegenwicht voor commerciële uitgevers).

Uit diezelfde onderzoeken wordt ook duidelijk dat er een infrastructuur (zowel technisch als organisatorisch) nodig is om de drempels voor adoptie van OER zo laag mogelijk te maken:

  • Een technische infrastructuur moet ervoor zorgen dat open bronnen eenvoudig te delen en te vinden zijn, dat bronnen in een format beschikbaar zijn die aanpassing mogelijk maken (door bijvoorbeeld niet alleen een bron te publiceren in een format dat voor gebruik handig is, maar ook in een format dat aanpassing mogelijk maakt). Op diverse plekken wordt al eraan gewerkt om die infrastructuur te realiseren (bijvoorbeeld in de zone Naar digitale (open) leermaterialen in het Versnellingsplan Onderwijsinnovatie met ICT).
  • Een organisatorische infrastructuur moet ervoor zorgen dat voor docenten (de decisive change agents in deze adoptie) optimale ondersteuning (ICT, onderwijskundig en auteursrechtelijk) en een veilige experimenteeromgeving beschikbaar is. Een dergelijke infrastructuur kan worden geborgd door een instellingsbeleid op dit punt. De UNESCO publicatie Guidelines on the Development of Open Educational Resources Policies levert handvatten om een dergelijk beleid te formuleren.

Deze periode maakt ook duidelijk dat toegang tot voldoende geëquipeerde ICT voor een grote groep lerenden in Nederland niet voldoende gerealiseerd is. Wellicht is dat minder een probleem in een genormaliseerde situatie, maar deze beperktere toegang, veelal vanwege financiële motieven, strekt zich ook uit naar toegang tot leermaterialen. De financiële voordelen van gebruik van open leermaterialen worden daarmee niet alleen ervaren door de instelling die ze adopteren, maar ook door de lerenden.

Docenten ervaren in deze periode ook aan den lijve dat online afstandsonderwijs een andere tak van sport is dan face-2-face. Het vereist een ander ontwerp en andere didactische werkvormen dan in een face-2-face situatie mogelijk is. Het is daarom niet verwonderlijk dat veel van de hulpbronnen die nu snel online zijn gebracht handvatten geven om hierin eerste stappen te zetten. Daar waar in deze periode ruimte is om deze ervaringen goed te ondersteunen en uit te bouwen door docenten duidelijk te maken dat een aantal voordelen van deze veranderingen ook in een genormaliseerde situatie kunnen gelden, zal dat ongetwijfeld bijdragen aan blijvende adoptie. Die ruimte moet er niet alleen in tijd zijn, maar ook mentaal. Die mentale ruimte kan door de eerder genoemde angst en onzekerheid die deze periode met zich meebrengt beperkt zijn, maar het is de moeite waard alert te zijn op deze kansen. Adoptie van OER, of breder, adoptie van opener vormen van onderwijs maakt bijvoorbeeld vormen van onderwijs beter mogelijk met kenmerken als student agency en alternatieve vormen van toetsing (non-disposable assignment). Deze vormen staan bekend onder de parapluterm Open Pedagogy. De SURF Special Interest Groep Open Education heeft hier eind vorig jaar een publicatie over uitgebracht met meer informatie.

Welke ervaringen die nu worden opgedaan met gebruik van OER zullen beklijven? Zullen docenten blijvend hun colleges opnemen met hun eigen webcam en die opnamen delen en welke toegevoegde waarde wordt daarvan dan ervaren? Zullen de ervaringen juist leiden tot een grotere aversie tegen online onderwijs of tot meer bewustzijn dat de mix van online en face-2-face door inzet van OER voordelen kan bieden waar men zich tot nu toe nooit bewust van was? Zal dit alles leiden tot een grotere vraag naar ondersteuning en zijn instellingen daarop voorbereid? Kunnen we studenten een grotere rol geven in de adoptie van OER, bijvoorbeeld door zicht te krijgen op de bronnen die zij verzamelen? Zoeken docenten elkaar nu ook virtueel op en kan dat een kiem zijn voor een vakcommunity waarin maken, delen en hergebruiken van OER een rol heeft? De tijd zal het leren, maar door nu alert te zijn op kansen en daarnaar te handelen kan op een opener toekomst worden voorgesorteerd.

Referenties

Rogers, E. M. (2003). Diffusion of innovations (5th ed.). New York, NY: Free Press

Schuwer, R., & Janssen, B. (2018). Adoption of Sharing and Reuse of Open Resources by Educators in Higher Education Institutions in the Netherlands: A Qualitative Research of Practices, Motives, and Conditions. The International Review of Research in Open and Distributed Learning19(3). https://doi.org/10.19173/irrodl.v19i3.3390

 

UNESCO Recommendation on OER


This post is also available in Dutch.

At the end of November, UNESCO’s General Conference adopted the Recommendation on OER. This was the result of more than five years of work, starting from the Paris OER Declaration of 2012, with the 2nd World Congress on OER in 2017 in Ljubljana as an intermediate stage, where an Action Plan on OER was adopted (see the blog I wrote about it at the time). At the OEGlobal Conference in Milan, Mitja Jermol (UNESCO Chair in Slovenia and closely involved in drawing up the Recommendation) gave a hint of what such a process looks like (video).

What is a UNESCO Recommendation?

On the UNESCO website you can find which instruments UNESCO distinguishes between. Although it can be found there that one instrument is not superior to another, there are essential differences between (the impact of) a Declaration and a Recommendation (emphasis added by me):

  • “Recommendations are intended to influence the development of national laws and practices.”
  • “(A declaration) set forth universal principles to which the community of States wished to attribute the greatest possible authority and to afford the broadest possible support.”

A country that has signed the OER Recommendation is also commended to report periodically on the progress it has made in implementing the Recommendation:

(The General Conference) decides that the periodicity of the reports of Member States on the measures taken by them to implement the Recommendation concerning Open Educational Resources (OER) will be every four years;

There was no such obligation in the Paris OER Declaration, which gave that instrument a somewhat more non-committal approach to compliance.

The overview of UNESCO Recommendations (updated to the previous General Conference in 2017) shows that the Recommendation on OER is the 35th since UNESCO was founded (the first is from 1956) and the 9th that deals with education (the first is from 1960). This illustrates the importance that UNESCO attaches to the large-scale adoption of OER, particularly as one of the means of achieving Sustainable Development Goal 4 (ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all). The Recommendation is intended for all educational sectors, not just higher education.

The text of the Recommendation currently available is a Draft version of 8 October. This text was adopted unanimously at the General Conference. The final text therefore does not deviate (to my knowledge) from this Draft and will soon be available on the UNESCO website.

What is the content of the Recommendation?

The Recommendation aims at:

  • Achieving sustained investment and educational actions by governments and other key education stakeholders, as appropriate, in the creation, curation, regular updating, ensuring inclusive and equitable access, and effective use of high quality educational and research materials and programmes of study.

  • Through the application of open licences to educational materials achieving more cost-effective creation, access, re-use, re-purpose, adaptation, redistribution, curation, and quality assurance of those materials.

  • Through judicious application of OER, in combination with appropriate pedagogical methodologies, well-designed learning objects and the diversity of learning activities, a broader range of innovative pedagogical options are available to engage both instructors and learners to become more active participants in educational processes and creators of content as members of diverse and inclusive Knowledge Societies.

  • Achieving regional and global collaboration and advocacy in the creation, access, re-use, re-purpose, adaptation, redistribution and evaluation of OER can enable governments and education providers to evaluate the quality of the open access content and to optimise their own investments in educational and research content creation, as well as ICT infrastructure and curation, in ways that will enable them to meet their defined national educational policy priorities more cost-effectively and sustainably.

These goals also address the question: why should efforts be made to increase the adoption of OER? How do OER contribute to the realisation of SDG 4? The added value of OER is not only making education more accessible by lowering financial thresholds and taking account of people with disabilities, but the use of OER in teaching and learning situations also leads to a richer learning environment due to the greater availability of learning materials on which a user can exercise the 5R rights. In addition, these objectives emphasise the importance of collaboration between stakeholders.

In order to achieve these goals, five action lines have been defined:

  1. Capacity building: ensuring that sufficient knowledge about and resources for the adoption of making, sharing, reuse, and dissemination of OER and the use of open licences are available.
  2. Developing supportive policy: encouraging governments, authoritative educational institutions (for example in the Netherlands VSNU, VH, SURF, and Kennisnet) and educational institutions to adopt regulatory frameworks to support open licensing of publicly funded educational and research materials, develop strategies to enable use and adaptation of OER in support of high quality, inclusive education and lifelong learning for all, supported by relevant research in the area.
  3. Effective, inclusive and equitable access to quality OER: supporting the adoption of strategies and programmes including through relevant technology solutions that ensure OER in any medium are shared in open formats and standards to maximize equitable access, co-creation, curation, and searchability, including for those from vulnerable groups and persons with disabilities
  4. Nurturing the creation of sustainability models for OER: supporting and encouraging the creation of sustainability models for OER at national, regional and institutional levels, and the planning and pilot testing of new sustainable forms of education and learning.
  5. Fostering and facilitating international cooperation: supporting international cooperation between stakeholders to minimize unnecessary duplication in OER development investments and to develop a global pool of culturally diverse, locally relevant, gender-sensitive, accessible, educational materials in multiple languages and formats.

The Recommendation also contains statements on the monitoring of activities undertaken by governments to implement the action lines: measuring the effectiveness and efficiency of OER policy, collecting and disseminating good practices, innovations, and research reports on the application of OER and their consequences, and developing strategies for monitoring the effectiveness of OER in education and the long-term financial efficiency of OER. As already mentioned, governments are required to report periodically on the results of these monitoring activities.

What does this mean for education in the Netherlands?

At first sight, the Recommendation seems to lead mainly to activities for the government. However, I think that this document should also (and perhaps especially) be fleshed out from the bottom up. Stakeholders such as VSNU, VH, SURF, and Kennisnet, as well as individual educational institutions in all educational sectors, could consider:

  • Develop a vision of the adoption of OER in their context. This vision should make statements not only about open sharing of learning resources, but also about their reuse. Such a vision cannot be considered in isolation from a broader vision on education, so the role OER can play in the educational context also becomes clear.
  • Translating the vision into a policy on the adoption of OER. A study (publication and report (in Dutch)) that Ben Janssen and I carried out in the higher education sector revealed that there are a number of issues that need to be addressed: increasing awareness among instructors, ensuring that there is sufficient time available, safe room for experimentation, sufficient knowledge about OER, and support (in the areas of copyright, educational technology, and ICT).
  • Encourage collaboration with other institutions. That does not necessarily have to be done internationally (as described in the last action line). Not only can collaboration ultimately lead to more efficient processes for creating and reusing OER, but by working together with several institutions it becomes a means of learning about each others educational practices, which can be at least as valuable.
  • Encourage initiatives that are already being undertaken from the bottom up, for example by providing time and support. This can be done in parallel with the more policy-oriented activities mentioned above.
  • Facilitate research into how OER initiatives can ultimately be made sustainable (i.e. independent of initial project subsidies) within an institution.

Availability of learning materials, both open and closed, is less of an issue in the Dutch context than, for example, in large parts of the Global South. However, there seems to be less attention for adapting these learning materials for people with disabilities. For example, a random search in the Wikiwijs database reveals that most of the materials I find there do not offer facilities to support visually impaired people. Adoption of OER by instructors will, however, be encouraged when the role OER can play in realising their vision of education is clear. The “what’s in it for me” question will then be addressed. The aforementioned research by Ben Janssen and myself suggested that that question should be clear for instructors for successful adoption of OER.

Many tools (toolkits, step-by-step plans) are already available to support these activities. At the national level, SURF has developed tools that can be used, and Kennisnet is working on something similar. UNESCO and the Commonwealth of Learning recently published a report Guidelines on the Development of Open Educational Resources Policies that contains concrete tools for formulating policy on OER (see an earlier blog post). Internationally, a coalition has been formed in which, for example, Creative Commons and the Open Education Global participate. This coalition aims to provide artifacts and services to support parties in implementing the Recommendation.